About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CSPAN 5
MSNBC 5
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the fact is we went into a country to fight al qaeda who was all in the mountains in pakistan and even in the cities in pakistan, probably with the knowledge of the pakistani government. and we've wasted a lot of money and lives in an area where we didn't need to be, because that war will continue. there are only 100 al qaeda give or take left in afghanistan. but there are al qaeda in other spots in the middle east. and al qaeda's people have plotted terrorist activities from germany and from other places in europe. they don't need osama bin laden's base to have activity. there's nothing you need -- as far as the soviet union, the soviet union went down for goodly reasons, because of all the money they spent in afghanistan. true, we were there fighting them, but their attempt at gaining empire, which has been the loss of many empires, stretching too far and going beyond their supply lines, killed them. they spent money there and they'd like us to stay there. they're being real nice to us. they're helping us with bases, to bring in armaments and troops and supplies. come on, america. sp
and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been we
and pakistan. we must always be on our guard, but now, i am informed that this figure has been significantly reduced. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakens. in afghanistan, british and other forces have driven al qaeda from their bases, and while it is too early to tell for certain, initial evidence shows we have halted the certai suggests we halted the momentum of the talibannsurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighti and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no pper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afgha
and cut out. >>> the u.s. may decide to withhold millions in military aid to pakistan. this is according to a "new york times" report. the u.s. is said to be unhappy with the efforts that pakistani army has been making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got
on counterterrorism efforts with pakistan, setting up officer training academies for afghan police and security operations in the region. this is an hour. >> prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with the mission i'd like to make a statement on afghanistan. from the outset this government has sought to take a more hard-headed, more security-based approach to our mission. as i said, we're not there to build a perfect democracy. still less a model society. yes, we will help with the establishment of democratic institutions. yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage development. but we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to ensure our own national security by helping the afghans to take control of theirs. this means building up the afghan security forces so we can drawdown british combat forces with the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is particularly poignant today, i believe, mr. speaker, on the eve of the sixth anniversary of 7/7, an attack that was executed by extremi
efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
of the sanctuary across the border in pakistan. >> until the problem of insurgent and terror sanctuary in pakistan is effectively addressed and that can be addressed through military means. it can be addressed through political means or a combinations there of which is very much of our approach. until that problem has been satisfactorily addressed, then our enterprise in afghanistan and the long-term stability of afghanistan remains at risk. they look across the border into pakistan and see sanctuary there. they see enemy capability there. they see enemy leaders that are there that are not being hit right now. so their question is, why do we need 100,000 american troops inside of afghanistan when we know that a very big part of this problem sits inside of pakistan? >> reporter: a grim reality right there from the ambassador as he leaves afghanistan where he says that he will leave a part of his heart behind. chuck? >> all right. atia in kabul. thanks very much. >> those u.s. drone attacks in afghanistan have killed 45 militants in the last 24 hours. it comes a day after washington announced it wou
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
million in military aide to pakistan. relations between the two countries took a major hit after u.s. forces killed osama bin laden in pakistan. that was back in may. those ties are on even shake yes, sir ground. peter doocy has more from washington. >> reporter: $800 million less. that is what pakistan is going to be getting us from military aide, getting shaved off the 2 plus billion, now the white house says is because they could be more helpful in rounding up terrorists and they gave hundred u.s. army trainers the boot in the last few weeks. >> obviously they have been an important ally but they have been a victim of enormous amounts of terrorism but they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were given to their military. >> the communication breakdown regarding our raid on their soil to kill bin laden, some critics say maybe they knew there was all along. brand-new secretary of defense, l leon panetta says we don't know enough yet. >> everybody has suspicions about pakistanis, what they knew reality is their are investigations being co
of pakistan. he also revealed that up to 20 top al qaeda leaders from pakistan, yemen, and somalia were identified from laden's compound and are now on america's target list. topping that list, american-born clericÑi anwar al awlaki, leade of al qaeda in yemen, considered the greatest terrorist threat to the united states, the so-called christmas day bomber, was trained and equipped by al qaeda in yemen. panetta confirmed today that the cia has joined the u.s. military in launching air strikes aimed at taking out the leadership of al qaeda in yemen and warned the u.s. must remain relentless in pursuit of al qaeda. >> i think now is the moment, now is the moment, following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: despite the progress, panetta warns that al qaeda still remains a serious threat, and even after his success at the cia in bringing down bin laden, panetta says that al qaeda itself will still be a top priority of his in his new job at the pentagon. lester.
to then finding out more key leaders in al qaeda. he mentioned about ten to 20 leaders. possibly in pakistan. >> he will be meeting his counterpart who will also be meeting the afghan president, but most importantly, he is going to be meeting the commanders on the ground and the service men and women fighting the fight in afghanistan coming at a very important time in the fight in afghanistan primarily because this is when we expect the transition to begin in certain parts of afghanistan, parts where they're going to be handing over the responsibility to the afghans themselves. also coming at a time when president obama has already announced the draw down efforts hoping for that to end by the year 2014. >> with regard to that, how overall is the fighting going in afghanistan? i mean, are we getting much closer in a palpable way to turning things over to the afghan security forces themselves? >> well, alex, when you talk to officials here on the ground, when you talk to the commanders on the ground, they'll tell you they are closer to that time where they can pass it over to the afghan people
the u.s. and pakistan have been even more tense since bin laden was killed. today, word tensions may have reached a new high. plus in the race for the white house, new hampshire, of course, a key stop. congressman with local roots will share his insight on which contenders could see success in his state. stay with us. [ mom ] one of the challenges for kayla being gluten-free is actually finding choices the whole family will love. five flavors of chex are gluten-free, including the honey nut flavor. and it's nice for me to be able to syes" to something that they want to eat. [ male announcer ] chex cereal. five flavor gluten free to something that they want to eat. funny thing about vegetables... they fill you up without filling you out. yes! v8 juice gives you three of your five daily servings of vegetables. that's what i'm talking about! v8. what's your number? a living, breathing intelligence that's helpi drive the future of business. in here, inventory can be taught to learn. ♪ machines have a voice. ♪ medical history follows you. it's the at&t network -- a network of possibil
the remaining leaders. >> somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders that between pakistan, yemen, somalia, aqim and north africa, those are -- if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the new al-qaeda chief continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he said he believes the al-qaeda leader may well be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas. and general petraeus, who leaves his post here this month to head the c.i.a., also said today, al-qaeda was on the run, in his opinion. enormous damage is being done to the al-qaeda network over the border in pakistan. back to you. >> rick: david piper on the phone from kabul for us. thanks for the update. >> rick: getting the royal treatment, a polo club in california hosting a future king, prince william is taking part in a charity polo match right now and his new bride, the duchess of cambridge is on hand cheering him on. the royal couple mingling with hollywood royalty on their trip to the u.s. casey stegall live in santa barbara. who is a
their ability . also he believes that al-zawahri may be over the border in pakistan's northwestern federally administered tribal area. the defense secretary will have to deal with tense relations with pakistan following the killing of osama bin laden there. he said there was efforts to help them in the hunt for al-qaida members. but he said they have helped in the past track some of them down. back to you. >> david, in kabul. >> political sacrifices are needed on both sides of the aisle to solve the budget critesis. will democrats and republicans move past the rhetoric when they sit down in the white house tomorrow. >> hi, to you john. goal to whack four trillion off of the deficit over 10 years. president obama emphasized the positive. >>ed -- the good news is, we agree on the big thingings. after racking up deficit debts we need to get our fiscal house in order. both sides are going to have to step outside of the comfort zones and make political sacrifices. >> it sounds good but easier said than done. players mest thursday . they will vote on increasing the debt ceiling. if they don't rais
and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and days later an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the cap all? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were sporp not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces who saw the crisis response unit said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of afghan forces is uneven at best. witnesses at the hotel told us some afghan police ran away from the suicide as
operations forces killed the world's most wanted man in a raid on a house in pakistan. the operation gave the world a glimpse into a vast and secret campaign being waged by the united states. it's known as the kill/capture program. >> all right, spot on 1-6-0. ( explosion ) >> was it good? >> roger, control. >> narrator: it's a campaign that the military says has killed or captured more than 12,000 militants in the last year. ( explosion ) using cutting-edge technology, elite teams are hunting down taliban and al qaeda leaders one by one, and taking them out. >> firing. missile away. >> missile's away. >> roger that. ( indistinct radio chatter ) >> we're getting so good at various electronic means of identifying, tracking, locating, members of the insurgency that we're able to employ this extraordinary machine, an almost industrial-scale counterterrorism killing machine that has been able to pick out and take off the battlefield not just the top-level, al qaeda- level insurgents, but also increasingly is being used to target mid-level insurgents. >> narrator: the kill/capture program is v
.s. troops in afghanistan. this report out of the "new york times" says the aid could resume if pakistan takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan as i was mentioning. panetta is meeting with american military leaders as well as afghan officials. atia abawi is in kabul, afghanistan. he's making strong remarks when it comes to al qaeda and how he wants to continue stamping them out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. that's absolutely right. on his flight from d.c. to kabul he did speak to reporter on the plane that he was on about al qaeda and said that the strategic defeat of al qaeda was within reach, pointing to the death of osama bin laden, pointing to the information that we were able to retrieve from his compound, including the names of key leaders that they'd like to go after. and he says that this is the time to go after al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue thi
they be in yemen, somalia, pakistan or north and central africa. but on this trip in afghanistan panetta is expected to meet with his counterpart, the defense ministry in afghanistan, and he is also expected to have a press conference with the afghan president, hamid karzai. aside from that, the most important part of the visit is talking to the u.s. commanders on the ground here in afghanistan, talking to the u.s. servicemen and women as well who are fighting the fight within the country. right now the strategic time within the war and afghanistan, the president announced the withdrawal plan by the end of this year. 10,000 americans are supposed to leave the country by the end of next year. he's hoping another $23,000 by next year. right now the time for secretary panetta to talk to the commanders here, to the afghan government here, to see how to transition the authority they have in afghanistan back to the afghan people. >> do you think the key to targeting al qaeda is all the information taken from osama bin ladin's compound on may 2nd? >> reporter: well, that's the big question. did
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
in afghanistan and pakistan. not later than 120 days after enactment of this act, the entity described in subsection 8, shall submit to the president and the congress, a report. sense of congress, it is the sense of congress that the entity should be modeled on the iraq study group. section 8127, not more than $200 million may be expended -- the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise. mr. carter: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 31 printed in the congressional record offered by mr. carter of texas. strike lines 6 through 9 relating to military musical units. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized for five minutes. mr. carter: i rise to address an issue i think is very important to the patriotic men and women who fight and defend our country. representative mccollum, in good graces, asked that we restrict the military band funding by $120 million and in an attempt to help with the savings. but the congressional budget office has informed us that this reduction, this $120 million re
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)